It’s not a light bulb that appears… it’s a chandelier!

Chandelier MARLO

I love watching battle rap videos to see creativity at work. Watching how they respond to things being chucked at them live. I have a blog planned on ‘What Battle Rap taught me’ coming in 2015. Until then, here’s a cute quote that made me want to change the tagline for Ideas Genius. Video on our Facebook page.

“When we have ideas, it’s not a light bulb that appears… it’s a chandelier”

#Classic

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The B Word

Some phrases stick in your head for a long time. A rather colourful Product Development lecturer once commented that ‘accountants are the condom on the (man parts) of progress’. I have censored his statement here for obvious reasons but the intent of his remark is clear. Looking at creativity by what your budget allows you to achieve limits your fullest potential.

So why do budgets – the B-word – have such a bad name? After all, managing budgets is a great skill to have. We are encouraged to be wise and mindful of our resources. 

In creative terms, working with a budget as you develop your ideas or ambition is like buying a dress and then dieting to fit into it. Of course you should be aware of your current financial means. However, they should not dictate how ambitious you can be.

A good idea comes from being able to think freely and creatively. That should also apply to how you view using your money. A helpful process for thinking this through is:

  1. What could you do if money wasn’t a concern?
  2. Are you able to fund it with your existing budget?
  3. How else could you get it done?
  4. Who else would be interested in getting the most out of the idea? (see post on partnerships)

Budgets are a tool rather than a permission to make something amazing happen. The discipline and strategy of budget management are good for things you want to control. However, chances are you do not want to limit your best possible ideas before you have had them because you don’t think you can afford it.

To get the best out of your creative process, teams or efforts, forget the B-Word. At least until you have a good enough idea. Then use your best budgeting skills to make it happen.

Problems cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that first created them

Albert Einstein

Albert


Not to be confused with the Sun Tzu Art of War book. Steven Pressfield discusses here how we can avoid the roadblocks of any creative endeavour — be it starting up a dream business venture, writing a novel, or painting a masterpiece.